Dr. Frederick Chen

Internationales Kolleg für Geisteswissenschaftliche Forschung "Schicksal, Freiheit und Prognose. Bewältigungsstrategien in Ostasien und Europa"
Hartmannstr. 14
91052 Erlangen




Chinese personal name: 陳世崇

Home Institution: Faculty of Archaeology and Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford


IKGF Visiting Fellow November 2013 - October 2014

(Last change of profile by end of stay)

IKGF Research Project:

Fate in Afterlife, Freedom, and the Origins of the Early Enumeration of Hellish Kings in Early Medieval Chinese Buddhist Scripture


Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Frederick Shih-Chung Chen holds a DPhil degree in Oriental Studies from the University of Oxford and two MA degrees, in Oriental and African Religions and in the History and Culture of Medicine, respectively, from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He is a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland. In 2004-2005, he was a research fellow at the Institute of Oriental Studies, University of Tokyo, sponsored by the Bukkyō Dendō Kyōkai fellowship. After completing his DPhil degree, he was awarded Post-doctoral fellowships by the National Science Council of Taiwan R.O.C. and the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation of European Region during 2010-2012, to conduct his research project, “The Early Formation of the Buddhist Otherworld Bureaucracy in Early Medieval China,” at the Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford. He has published articles on related topics, which will eventually be collected in a planned book. Before arriving at IKGF, he was a researcher on the project, “Buddhist Stone Inscriptions in China”, at the Heidelberg Academy of Science and Humanities and a research associate at the Faculty of Archaeology, University of Oxford.

Dr. Chen specializes in East Asian Buddhism and Chinese religions. He is also interested in the history of Chinese medicine and the history of knowledge transmission. His current research focuses on transcultural exchange between Buddhism and Chinese religions in the border areas of China during the early medieval and medieval periods.

Selected Publications

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